Social Policy

Social Policy

  • Judit Sági – Csaba Lentner – Tibor Tatay

Family Allowance Issues

Family Allowance Issues

Decline in the desire to have children is a common problem in the developed world, and it is a challenge in post-soviet countries, including Hungary. Changing lifestyles, perceptions and financial stress are the underlying reasons. The Czech, Slovakian, Spanish, Portuguese, Irish and French government interventions are analysed with focus on family subsidies and fiscal policies, in comparison to the decisions taken by the Hungarian government after 2010. Research is built on the assumption that child benefits (family allowances and housing subsidies) increase the willingness to have children.

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  • András Giday – Szilvia Szegő

Towards the “Child-to-Parent” Based Pension Allowance (“C2P”)

Towards the “Child-to-Parent” Based Pension Allowance (“C2P”)

Our basic assumption is that the pension reform, paid employment and child rearing (including housework) are inextricably interlinked and a policy for one “life stage” cannot be reformed without consideration to the entire family life. The proposed child-to-parent based pension allowance (“C2P”) aims at remedying the worsening interconnectedness of two different deficit types: population and financial deficit in the pension regime. The demographic basis of a sustainable population and pension scheme necessarily includes children. We discuss a model which can improve interaction between child-rearing and the pension scheme. The current pension schemes typically allocate only a minimal allowance (about 2-3 per cent of the total pension budget) to those who raise children.

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  • Bence Balassa – Tamás Bezsenyi

The Organisation of Accelerating Economic Offenses During the Change of Regime

The Organisation of Accelerating Economic Offenses During the Change of Regime

In his book titled The Shape of Time. Remarks on the History of Things, George Kubler criticised the nature of chronologically and linearly approached and explained historical concept. He claims that applying biological metaphors to the periodical changes in history results in the adverse consequence that it presumes repetitious life cycles in different eras of the past. Shaping a new criminal method or trick is mutatis mutandis an initial sequence-starter object, just like a painting projecting a new, original ap-proach. However, not only the existence of the original work of art is necessary, it must be subject to reliable verification, we cannot always identify the first perpetrator of the given criminal method.

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  • Tamás Prugberger – Hilda Tóth – Andrea Szőllős

The Development of the Hungarian Labour and Public Service Laws After the Regime Change

The Development of the Hungarian Labour and Public Service Laws After the Regime Change

The first Hungarian government that took office after the change of regime was also the first in the post-communist region to codify regulations similar to the West-European labour and public service law. The intent of the new Hungarian codification was to reconcile employers’ and employees’ interests. Hungary joined the European Union on 1 May, 2004. In the course of the accession negotiations, many labour law directives were incorporated into Hungarian law and order. Therefore, our labour law regulations could be regarded as EU-compliant. When the legislature re-codified labour law in 2012, the aim was to confront international economic challenges so as to make labour law regulations more flexible and increase employment and economic growth. Meanwhile, significant modifications in the public sector directly served this goal by establishing a new life and career model for civil and public servants.

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