• Tímea Kozma, Imre Túróczi, Szilveszter Zsolnai, Róbert Tóth

Announcement about Challenges of Fruit Wine Industry in Hungary

Announcement about Challenges of Fruit Wine Industry in Hungary

Everywhere in the world, the culture of grape wine goes back centuries or even millennia. In Hungary, the consumption of Hungarian grape wine plays a significant role in everyday life, while fruit wines are regarded by consumers as unknown, unusual, inaccessible premium products or as beverages for occasional consumption. In the 19th century, the drinking of fruit wine used to be preferred in Hungary. Over the years, a culture of fruit wines and production wineries has evolved throughout Europe on a fairly strong basis, and has, in an unusual way, escaped the ‘attention’ of Hungarian producers and consumers. The aim of this study is to explore the values and opportunities of the fruit wine sector. It is not well-known in Hungary, but there is a great deal of potential in this sector, which, as opportunities unfold, would become more widely known to the consumer society. It could become one of the potential sectors of our country besides the production of pálinka and grape wine.

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  • Márton Gellén, Anita Mária Rácz

Motivation and Professionalisation in Hungarian Civil Service – an Empirical Analysis on Hungarian Regional Civil Service

Motivation and Professionalisation in Hungarian Civil Service – an Empirical Analysis on Hungarian Regional Civil Service

The article displays and analyses the results of empirical research, in the context of mainstream public sector motivation PSM literature, and in the context of the recent Hungarian legislation on public service personnel management. The aim of the article is to clarify the impact of the new legislation on the motivation of Hungarian civil servants. The findings ought to be interpreted with references to the complexities of practice in Central and Eastern European civil service, widely considered as Weberian, although with significant elements of legalism, politicisation and post-Soviet management style. As this public administration culture is heterogeneous and its components are contradicting, changes in public personnel management policies might lead to unexpected or largely varying effects. This article presents the findings of public personnel management policy change through the evaluation of the responses of civil servants in regional civil service. The article concludes that the subjective value of job security is less than expected, but satisfaction with the pay is significantly above expected. Streams for promotion are frozen, good workforce is difficult to retain in civil service but those who remain in the service consider themselves highly motivated, receiving helpful support from their supervisors and feeling that they have a rewarding job in serving the public.

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