Hungary's Regions, Competitiveness and Country Image

  • János Amrik – Gusztáv G. Hittig – Zsolt Gál – Judit Bárczi – Zoltán Zéman

Investing in the Future

Investing in the Future

The purpose of this study is to investigate empirically the role of innovation activity in 16+1 cooperation, within the Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). We also identified those internal and external factors, which might cause improvements in innovation performance of CEE companies. Our main focus was on technology-based research and innovations. We applied qualitative research methods. Our findings demonstrate that CEE companies have significant contribution to performance. We found that key success factors of these organisations are based on four elements: knowledge management, access to financial resources, managing formal and informal networks, as well as achieving synergies between technological and non-technological innovations. The preparation of the analytical study was facilitated by being part of a Slovenian-Hungarian MASH European Grouping of Territorial Cooperation and thus, through our cross-border relations, we have more information, we are deeper into the functioning and / or non-functioning EU systems.

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  • Tibor Pintér

The Integration of Hungary into the European Union – Economic Aspects

The Integration of Hungary into the European Union – Economic Aspects

Hungary became a member of the European Union on 1 May 2004, together with nine other, predominantly Central and Eastern European countries. The establishment and tightening up of institutional relations with the European Union started in the period before this date. In the course of the accession negotiations, Hungary had to fulfil a large number of criteria included in accession chapters; and the political deals and legislative harmonization laid the basis for Hungary to be able to succeed as an EU Member State. There is a wide range of approaches to integration, of course: in addition to the political and social dimensions, economic integration is also a legitimate, scientifically used and discussed concept. The statistical data examined in this study show that the Hungarian economy’s state of integration is controversial.

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  • Judit Sági – István Engelberth

Regional Development and Well- Being of Regions in Hungary

Regional Development and Well- Being of Regions in Hungary#SUP#1#/SUP#

The purpose of this study is to formulate policy views from the perceived trends in re-gional development, as measured by the change in regional well-being indicators and urban prosperity factors. The theoretical foundations of these development policies are formulated by place-based regional strategies. Based on the OECD database on well-being indicators, ranking by the Global Urban Competitiveness Research Centre and the International Congress and Convention Association, the authors have found that despite regional disparities and the centrum-periphery gaps, well-being in Hungarian regions has improved. Moreover, Budapest has good potentials in strengthening connections and accelerating development, and may display its advantages in attracting global production factors.

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  • Dávid Fekete

Latest Results of the Győr Cooperation Model

Latest Results of the Győr Cooperation Model

Nowadays partnership cooperation and city networks are of increasing significance in the operation of large cities. The essence of the model is that the key to local economic development, boosting innovation and increase in competitiveness is close cooperation between higher educational institutions, economic stakeholders and governing bodies to form the future of the region. Győr, a county capital, is the 6th largest city in Hungary. It is the centre of the most rapidly growing economic region, with its main employer being AUDI Hungaria, which in 2017, employed more than 12,000 people directly and nearly another 10,000 indirectly. The Győr Cooperation Model has four main stakeholders at the moment: the Hungarian government, the Municipality of Győr, the Széchenyi István University and the economic partners, especially AUDI Hungaria.

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  • Lajos Veres

The Current State and Future of the European Danube Region Strategy (EDRS)

The Current State and Future of the European Danube Region Strategy (EDRS)

The European Danube Region Strategy (EDRS) is a macro-regional development strategy and Action Plan for regions and countries in the Danube River Basin. Its purpose is to regulate the sustainable development of the Danube macro-region and the protection of its sites, landscapes and cultural values. The strategy plays a particularly important role in promoting sustainable transport, in linking energy systems, in environmental protection, and in the preservation of water resources in order to improve the business environment and offer a wide range of opportunities for economic development in the macro-region. This study presents the European Danube Region’s Strategic Action Plan and its priorities, paying special attention to Hungarian activities and businesses.

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  • Péter Szatmári – György Suha

International Development Policy Structures for Cooperation in Science, Technology and Education in Hungary

International Development Policy Structures for Cooperation in Science, Technology and Education in Hungary

In the context of Hungarian development policy, scientific and educational cooperation has a key role. The primary aim of this paper is to give an overview of the significant elements of the current international development cooperation and international humanitarian activities in Hungary. Secondly, it analyses, in a dimensional approach, the opportunities of policy and organisational structures and funding mechanisms for science, technology and innovation in developing countries. This article recommends more subtle ways of reforming political decisions that could support innovation with a deeper insight into some aspects of Hungarian “best practices”. Finally, it touches upon issues of tertiary education including the identification of funding instruments and interactions between the private sector and government actors.

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  • Gábor Kutasi

Stability of CEE Banks in the Crisis Years. Capital Adequacy and Too-Big-to-Fail Parent Banks in CEE

Stability of CEE Banks in the Crisis Years. Capital Adequacy and Too-Big-to-Fail Parent Banks in CEE

The paper analyses the factors of capital adequacy in the banking FDI of Central and East European countries by relying on the Bankscope database. The main hypothesis is that parent ownership mitigated the impacts of the financial crisis on commercial banks, as parent banks capitalized those affiliates which turned red in household and corporate lending. This type of cross-market rebalancing is tested by a regression analysis. Several different factors were identified such as the too-big-to-fail phenomenon of parent banks, the FX rate volatility, the changing monetary environment represented by a 3-month market rate, the fiscal shock caused by sector-specific taxes and the risk of debtor failures represented by proxy of non-performing ratios.

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  • István Tózsa

Hungarian Country Equity

Hungarian Country Equity

This study tries to shed light upon the unfavourable Hungarian reputation in Europe and the value of Hungarian country brand. In doing so, it explains the components and the formation of country image, association, awareness, loyalty and equity as well. The study concludes with showing the measures with which even small countries can improve their rankings in Simon Anholt’s global nation brand and good country index charts. These charts are based on the largest scale social big data study ever conducted and they exercise influence on the countries’ economic prospects. The study also reveals the global regions where the Hungarian government should focus country marketing in order to achieve the most rapid economic benefits.

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  • László Árva

Economic and Technical Factors Behind the Rise and Fall of Economic Globalization and Some Consequences in Hungary

Economic and Technical Factors Behind the Rise and Fall of Economic Globalization and Some Consequences in Hungary

Although globalization has been going on for quite a time, after 1970 it took new forms. Foreign direct investments were made in increasing amounts just to optimize the value chains of large transnational companies. The activities requiring unskilled workers were outsourced to underdeveloped peripheral countries like China, Vietnam and Malaysia in Asia, and after 1990, to Romania, Slovakia or Hungary in Central and Eastern Europe. At the same time the activities that require skilled and high-quality labour were kept in Western Europe. TNCs made profits on the difference between the low wages paid in peripheral countries and high prices charged in developed ones.

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