From Our Conservative Workshop

  • Szabolcs Pinnyey

What Is the Third Dimension of Economy Like? Review About a Book by Sarolta Laura Baritz, OP

What Is the Third Dimension of Economy Like? Review About a Book by Sarolta Laura Baritz, OP

The book Three-Dimensional Economy introduces a paradigm change in the economic thinking. It puts the elements of traditional economics into a new, value based approach. The book appoints human being as base and goal of economic activity, the system is embedded into the dimension of moral. The third dimension consists of values connected to moral, this way economy becomes a whole, integrated system.

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  • Csaba Lentner

The Taxonomy of Success. Review of a Book by György Matolcsy

The Taxonomy of Success. Review of a Book by György Matolcsy

This review puts under the microscope the book by György Matolcsy, Governor of the National Bank of Hungary, and the successful economic policy lurking behind it. This monograph is richly illustrated with elements from economic history and familiarises the reader with Hungary’s achievements in the field of fiscal and monetary policies, and their academic taxonomy.

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  • Tamás Prugberger

A Fictitious Discussion by Financial Experts About Hungary’s Position in the Changing World. Review of the Book Entitled Hungary in the Changing World (a Book by Mihály Patai, László Parragh and Csaba Lentner)

A Fictitious Discussion by Financial Experts About Hungary’s Position in the Changing World. Review of the Book Entitled Hungary in the Changing World (a Book by Mihály Patai, László Parragh and Csaba Lentner)

A collection of interviews with Mihály Patai, Chairman of the Hungarian Banking Association, László Parragh, Chairman of the Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and Professor Csaba Lentner, Head of the Institute for Public Finance of the National University of Public Service, has been published by Éghajlat Kiadó under the title Hungary in the Changing World. In the book, Hungary’s economic policy is discussed from the change of regime and the collapse of the Socialist planned economy to the present day, seen from the perspective of the three above-mentioned leading economists. This original and unconventional book examines problems in a complex manner and provides proposals worthy of consideration by political and economic leaders.

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  • Zoltán Nagy

Review of Books on the Scientific Taxonomy of New- Type Public Finances (Books by Csaba Lentner)

Review of Books on the Scientific Taxonomy of New- Type Public Finances (Books by Csaba Lentner)

As in numerous other places all over the world, unconventional instruments have come to the fore in Hungary since 2010 in fiscal policy and since 2013 in the monetary space. Changes in public finances have revealed the need for the writing of a scientific taxonomy to support practical mechanisms and its inclusion in the university curriculum. The main framework of a scientific taxonomy of Hungarian public finances, a taxonomy placed in a Hungarian historical and in an international context, is given in Public Finances and the Study of the General Government, Volume I, while a more detailed study of public finances, including financial and governmental management, taxation and control, is given in the volume entitled Fiscal Policy and the Management of Public Finances. Below is a review of these extremely significant books and the scientific taxonomy they reveal.

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  • Melinda Koczor-Keul – Tamás Molnár

A ‘Bittersweet’ Story. The Privatization of the Hungarian Sugar Industry (a Book by Péter Bertalan)

A ‘Bittersweet’ Story. The Privatization of the Hungarian Sugar Industry (a Book by Péter Bertalan)

Dr Péter Bertalan’s monograph, A ‘Bittersweet’ Story. The Privatization of the Hungarian Sugar Industry in the Light of Globalization and Geopolitics reveals the economic history of an era with scientific fastidiousness, but nevertheless in a readable and understandable style, by depicting an authentic picture of the privatization of the Hungarian sugar industry after the transition to democracy. Although his inquiry focuses on a single industry and, in particular, the Kaposvár sugar factory, he is not analysing a unique phenomenon. He places the bittersweet story of the sugar factory in a broader context, and points out the deeprooted conflicts and complex processes which accompanied the change of regime.

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